24 direct to video?

I can’t verify this article. Have no idea where it came from. (Possibly Zap2It.com.) Couldn’t find a similar link off news.google.com, either.

However, here’s a fascinating concept that could pave new ground for the DVD market and take it one step further.

Following the success of numerous made-for-video movies, Joel Surnow, creator of the Fox TV series 24, is planning to produce a version of the show that will only be available on DVD. “There’s a whole new business to be made out of direct-to-video TV programming,” Surnow told a Los Angeles conference Wednesday. As reported by Video Store Magazine, Surnow disclosed that the 24 DVD, which would be distributed by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, will use a different cast than the TV show but employ the same concept. He said that it is likely to be even more appealing than the TV series because viewers sometimes object to having to wait a week to see a new episode. He also indicated that previous DVD sales of the 24 TV series “helped justify the kind of money we have to spend to make the show.”

 
 
 

8 Responses to “24 direct to video?”

  1. Broc Heasley
    29. October 2003 at 12:34

    I don’t get it, it’s a different show called 24? Wierd. What I’m worried about is, if they make the jump straight to video, does that mean we get a lot of the same garbage cable puts in their shows (language, nudity, etc.) the the broadcast version doesn’t allow? This is an odd article. Love to find a link or find out more.

    BTW, 24 rocks. Last night’s episode was terrific, even if I did guess the twist 20 minutes in. Pretty obvious when you think about it, what does one do when one hangs around with a drug dealer?

  2. Colin Blair
    29. October 2003 at 14:05

    So, where is my entire season of Farscape direct to video?

  3. Jeff Wooten
    29. October 2003 at 15:02

    Here’s a link to the full “24 on DVD” article (via http://www.tvshowsondvd.com):

    http://www.videostoremag.com/news/html/breaking_article.cfm?sec_id=2&article_ID=5457

    Jeff Wooten

  4. pmpknface
    29. October 2003 at 15:23

    Last year my best friend would come over every week to watch the latest episode of 24. The best part of that hour was watching him beg, scream, and hollar at the TV at the end of every episode for MORE.

    (Well, that was almost as good as watching Kimmy run in slow motion… but I digress…)

    Direct to DVD would kick ass, and I’d give it a shot.

  5. Matthew M
    29. October 2003 at 16:25

    Sounds great to me. “24″ is the only show I swear by nowadays, and I’d love to see an expansion of the 24 “universe” to include other stories related to CTU exploits.

    Jack Bauer: The Early Years

    Kim Bauer: 24 Hours with Naked Mandy

    President Palmer’s Dance Machine

  6. Broc Heasley
    29. October 2003 at 19:08

    Thanks Jeff, that cleared it up for me. Sounds like it could be good…or it could be bad. Depends on the talent involved.

  7. John C.
    30. October 2003 at 10:08

    What intrigues me about the idea is that it foreshadows a whole new economic model. From what I understand, TV shows typically only make money once they get into syndication – that’s the holy grail. But if they can make money through DVD? Maybe this’ll become a new alternative for cancelled series? Could they have done a 13-ep Freaks & Geeks season and put it straight onto video? Like I said, intriguing.

  8. Patrick McCaw
    30. October 2003 at 21:33

    This reminds me of discussions in the comics industry. People arguing for all OGNs over ongoing or mini-series. The argument against I’ve always heard is that having to cover the creation costs with just the TPB will drive prices even higher. For example see Darwin Cooke’s Selina’s Big Score OGN, at $17.95, vs Planetary Vol. 1 collected TPB (the first book of comperable quality and, if even higher, page count from the same publisher), at $14.95.

    I can see a similar, and more dramatic, problem happening here. The 24 seasons each have list prices of $69.98 (I’m sure you can find it a lot cheaper, but still) for roughly 20 hours of film vs $19.99 for 2 hours of The Matrix (the cheap production costs of most direct to video explains their low cost). However, I’ve been told more than once, and no I don’t have reference right now, that the price is only that low because of the large revenues of the advertising of the initial run and syndication rights. Many movies (in my understanding) are lucky to break even at the box office, and only make the bucks with video. The process is reversed with TV, and I’m not sure you could change that easily. The only way I can see them making money is to cut production costs, and then why watch? On the other hand, maybe the creed of the 24 brand might make it sell enough. I guess that’s what Surnow means by “justify the kind of money … to make the show.”